Inside the Viper Room | Hollywood’s Most Exclusive Poker Game
Photo Illustration by Darrow. 
Nigella Lawson on the cover of Vanity Fair's U.K. Edition.
Read more about the divorce that dominated British tabloids here. 

Nigella Lawson on the cover of Vanity Fair's U.K. Edition.

Read more about the divorce that dominated British tabloids here

Scandal-O-Matic: The Obama Administration Edition
Your 10-step guide to the entirely predictable outcome of the unpleasantness in Washington.
By Bruce Feirstein | Illustrations by Walter C. Baumann

Scandal-O-Matic: The Obama Administration Edition

Your 10-step guide to the entirely predictable outcome of the unpleasantness in Washington.

By Bruce Feirstein | Illustrations by Walter C. Baumann

Behind the scenes of Kerry Washington’s Vanity Fair cover shoot with Norman Jean Roy.
Photograph by Rachel Williams. 
Washington Noir by James Wolcott
Political intrigue has taken a dark swoop ever since Aaron Sorkin’s The West Wing waved farewell from the tarmac on May 14, 2006 (how did liberals survive the Bush era without it?), fading into the afterlife of cable reruns, boxed DVD sets, and fond mentions in Maureen Dowd columns. It’s as if this Emmy-bestrewn series, set in the White House, took TV’s last traces of Frank Capra idealism with it, leaving behind a Venus-flytrap jungle of power junkies and craven flunkies doing the bidding of turf warriors and vicious infighters running agencies that barely have names, only cryptic initials. Forget what you’ve seen on C-SPAN, the nonprofit public-affairs network and insomnia remedy whose static cameras portray the cog workings of government as a vast, multi-chambered drone machine, an ongoing civics lesson devoid of color, dash, and lingerie-model sex romps intended to wrest a bill out of committee. Beneath the glacial pace of progress is a churning, libidinous top-dog struggle. The genre of Washington melodrama is a far more malignant game of thrones, blood pooling beneath the presidential seal.
Read more here. 

Washington Noir by James Wolcott

Political intrigue has taken a dark swoop ever since Aaron Sorkin’s The West Wing waved farewell from the tarmac on May 14, 2006 (how did liberals survive the Bush era without it?), fading into the afterlife of cable reruns, boxed DVD sets, and fond mentions in Maureen Dowd columns. It’s as if this Emmy-bestrewn series, set in the White House, took TV’s last traces of Frank Capra idealism with it, leaving behind a Venus-flytrap jungle of power junkies and craven flunkies doing the bidding of turf warriors and vicious infighters running agencies that barely have names, only cryptic initials. Forget what you’ve seen on C-SPAN, the nonprofit public-affairs network and insomnia remedy whose static cameras portray the cog workings of government as a vast, multi-chambered drone machine, an ongoing civics lesson devoid of color, dash, and lingerie-model sex romps intended to wrest a bill out of committee. Beneath the glacial pace of progress is a churning, libidinous top-dog struggle. The genre of Washington melodrama is a far more malignant game of thrones, blood pooling beneath the presidential seal.

Read more here

Ms. Kerry Goes to Washington | The First Lady of Scandal Speaks
Photograph by Norman Jean Roy.
Scandal's First Lady | Introducing our August cover star, Kerry Washington! 
Scandal Sheets | Kerry Washington on Filming Django Unchained
Photograph by Vincent Peters
“In light of this video, and as an individual who is proud to be Jewish, I will not be associated with Mr. Galliano in any way.”

Response from Natalie Portman, Dior beauty ambassador.