Out to Lunch with Questlove
Photograph by Platon. 

Out to Lunch with Questlove

Photograph by Platon. 

Coachella 2014: Behind the Scenes

See more photos here

Photographs by Catie Laffoon. 

To Live and Die in America
Nancy Jo Sales speaks to the surviving members of New York’s Iranian rock scene, after the deadly attack on the Yellow Dogs and friends. 
Photograph by Jonas Fredwall Karlsson. 

To Live and Die in America

Nancy Jo Sales speaks to the surviving members of New York’s Iranian rock scene, after the deadly attack on the Yellow Dogs and friends. 

Photograph by Jonas Fredwall Karlsson. 

Which Iconic Rock God Is Responsible for Matthew McConaughey’s Signature Catchphrase?

The Illustrated Guide to Taylor Swift’s BFFs, from Hipsters to Homecoming Queens
Illustration by Ryan Casey. 
The Surprising Oscar Couples You’ve Probably Forgotten
Remembering Rhapsody in Blue, from the March 1925 Issue of Vanity Fair. 
“It was at this rehearsal that Gershwin informed me … in a rather off-hand manner, that he had decided to compose a concerto in fantasia form for piano and jazz band which he proposed to call Rhapsody in Blue [to premiere] about four weeks [later]. At the second rehearsal Gershwin played the Rhapsody twice with the band on a very bad piano. Nevertheless, after hearing that rehearsal I never entertained a single doubt but that this young man of twenty-five … had written the very finest piece of serious music that had ever come out of America; moreover that he had composed the most effective concerto for piano that anybody had written since Tchaikovsky’s B flat minor.” –Carl Van Vechten, “George Gershwin,” March 1925

Remembering Rhapsody in Blue, from the March 1925 Issue of Vanity Fair. 

“It was at this rehearsal that Gershwin informed me … in a rather off-hand manner, that he had decided to compose a concerto in fantasia form for piano and jazz band which he proposed to call Rhapsody in Blue [to premiere] about four weeks [later]. At the second rehearsal Gershwin played the Rhapsody twice with the band on a very bad piano. Nevertheless, after hearing that rehearsal I never entertained a single doubt but that this young man of twenty-five … had written the very finest piece of serious music that had ever come out of America; moreover that he had composed the most effective concerto for piano that anybody had written since Tchaikovsky’s B flat minor.” –Carl Van Vechten, “George Gershwin,” March 1925

Queen of Darkness | A Journey Through Lorde’s Style Evolution