The Winter of Her Despair 
A symbol of strength for a traumatized nation in the winter of 1963–64, Jacqueline Kennedy was in fact falling apart—grieving and endlessly reliving her husband’s assassination, afflicted with what we’d now call post-traumatic stress disorder. Barbara Leaming, adapting her new biography, uncovers what was known to few outside the former First Lady’s inner circle: the nightmares, the drinking, the suicidal thoughts, but also the unexpected gesture that helped save her sanity.
Read the full story here. 

The Winter of Her Despair

A symbol of strength for a traumatized nation in the winter of 1963–64, Jacqueline Kennedy was in fact falling apart—grieving and endlessly reliving her husband’s assassination, afflicted with what we’d now call post-traumatic stress disorder. Barbara Leaming, adapting her new biography, uncovers what was known to few outside the former First Lady’s inner circle: the nightmares, the drinking, the suicidal thoughts, but also the unexpected gesture that helped save her sanity.

Read the full story here

Keeping the Flag Alive | Ralph Lauren
Photograph by Mark Seliger. 

Keeping the Flag Alive | Ralph Lauren

Photograph by Mark Seliger. 

Robert Capa’s Longest Day | Revisit the Photographer’s Gripping D-Day Coverage
Photograph by Robert Capa. 

Robert Capa’s Longest Day

Photographs by Robert Capa/ International Center of Photography/Magnum Photos.

The Golden Age of Ink
Watch Nick Hooker’s short film on the 1940s here. 

The Golden Age of Ink

Watch Nick Hooker’s short film on the 1940s here

November 22, 1963

Julia Child, Arthur Miller, and other luminaries reflect on the Kennedy assassination and where they were when the president was shot. 

See more here. 

President Nixon Meets the Troops | See Rare, Haunting Photos from the Vietnam War
Photograph by Bob Daugherty.
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Newton spent much of his time dwelling in a self-generated fog of superstition and crankery. He believed in the lost art of alchemy, whereby base metals can be transmuted into gold, and the surviving locks of his hair show heavy traces of lead and mercury in his system, suggesting that he experimented upon himself in this fashion, too. (That would also help explain the fires in his room, since alchemists had to keep a furnace going at all times for their mad schemes.) Not content with the narrow views of the philosopher’s stone and the elixir of life, he thought that there was a kind of universal semen in the cosmos, and that the glowing tails of the comets he tracked through the sky contained replenishing matter vital for life on Earth.

Read the full article here.