Martin, Maggie, and Me
In an excerpt from his memoir, late contributing editor Christopher Hitchens recalls the first time he met Margaret Thatcher: 

Within moments, too, I had turned away and was showing her my buttocks. I suppose that I must give some sort of explanation for this. Almost as soon as we shook hands on immediate introduction, I felt that she knew my name and had perhaps connected it to the socialist weekly that had recently called her rather sexy. While she struggled adorably with this moment of pretty confusion, I felt obliged to seek controversy and picked a fight with her on a detail of Rhodesia/Zimbabwe policy. She took me up on it. I was (as it happened) right on the small point of fact, and she was wrong. But she maintained her wrongness with such adamantine strength that I eventually conceded the point and even bowed slightly to emphasize my acknowledgment. “No,” she said. “Bow lower!” Smiling agreeably, I bent forward a bit farther. “No, no,” she trilled. “Much lower!” By this time, a little group of interested bystanders was gathering. I again bent forward, this time much more self-consciously. Stepping around behind me, she unmasked her batteries and smote me on the rear with the parliamentary order paper that she had been rolling into a cylinder behind her back. I regained the vertical with some awkwardness. As she walked away, she looked over her shoulder and gave an almost imperceptibly slight roll of the hip while mouthing the words “Naughty boy!”

Read more here. 

Martin, Maggie, and Me

In an excerpt from his memoir, late contributing editor Christopher Hitchens recalls the first time he met Margaret Thatcher: 

Within moments, too, I had turned away and was showing her my buttocks. I suppose that I must give some sort of explanation for this. Almost as soon as we shook hands on immediate introduction, I felt that she knew my name and had perhaps connected it to the socialist weekly that had recently called her rather sexy. While she struggled adorably with this moment of pretty confusion, I felt obliged to seek controversy and picked a fight with her on a detail of Rhodesia/Zimbabwe policy. She took me up on it. I was (as it happened) right on the small point of fact, and she was wrong. But she maintained her wrongness with such adamantine strength that I eventually conceded the point and even bowed slightly to emphasize my acknowledgment. “No,” she said. “Bow lower!” Smiling agreeably, I bent forward a bit farther. “No, no,” she trilled. “Much lower!” By this time, a little group of interested bystanders was gathering. I again bent forward, this time much more self-consciously. Stepping around behind me, she unmasked her batteries and smote me on the rear with the parliamentary order paper that she had been rolling into a cylinder behind her back. I regained the vertical with some awkwardness. As she walked away, she looked over her shoulder and gave an almost imperceptibly slight roll of the hip while mouthing the words “Naughty boy!”

Read more here

“In politics, if you want anything said, ask a man. If you want anything done, ask a woman.”

The Invincible Margaret Thatcher

Meryl, by a nose? The Oscar-nominated makeup team behind The Iron Lady just showed us exclusive photos—like this one—of the prosthetic and makeup tricks they used to turn fellow nominee Streep into prime minister Margaret Thatcher. Check out more photos—including the subtle nose-bridge reconstruction they did—here.
Photograph by Mark Coulier; courtesy of the Weinstein Company.

Meryl, by a nose? The Oscar-nominated makeup team behind The Iron Lady just showed us exclusive photos—like this one—of the prosthetic and makeup tricks they used to turn fellow nominee Streep into prime minister Margaret Thatcher. Check out more photos—including the subtle nose-bridge reconstruction they did—here.

Photograph by Mark Coulier; courtesy of the Weinstein Company.

I mean, it’s eerie.
Meryl Streep as Margaret Thatcher, with Michael Pennington, Martin Wimbush, and John Harding. Photograph by Brigitte Lacombe.

I mean, it’s eerie.

Meryl Streep as Margaret Thatcher, with Michael Pennington, Martin Wimbush, and John Harding. Photograph by Brigitte Lacombe.

-saturdaynightlive:

First look at Meryl Streep as Margaret Thatcher in The Iron Lady. Oscar, yes?

Her expression kind of makes it.

-saturdaynightlive:

First look at Meryl Streep as Margaret Thatcher in The Iron Lady. Oscar, yes?

Her expression kind of makes it.